Are the flowers left to die?

Like most of my posts, this post was prompted by Kat Harris and the crew over at The Refined Collective Series. Be sure and check out the other ladies in this wonderful group posted below. 

I have a story for you: On April 12th of this year I visited and enjoyed the Carlsbad Flower Fields with my family. We studied the blooms and celebrated the rainbow of life all around our feet. We were in awe of the carefully cared for fields of Ranunculus that seemed to be showing off. It looked like something straight out of a movie and as my niece kept saying, "so pretty"!  

April 12

APIRL 12

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Just a few weeks later I pulled off the freeway, curious to see if the flowers were still in bloom. I drove up to a dry desert like scene. The fields were closed and the blooms were almost all gone. Their stems dusty brown forming a hill of tall grasses. The flowers were no longer in bloom; I could visibly see that they had gone to seed and had died. I was in the same place, wearing almost the same exact outfit (not planned!) but the scenery could not have been more contrasted! 

For a second my heart sank. Had they really all died? Did they really only last that long? What is it worth to only live for a few months? Is that really their story - they bloom for only a few weeks out of the year and then are gone? 

I sat in my car letting my feelings sink. I concluded that I wished they would just stay in bloom their whole life - that I was sad they only “lasted” for a few weeks.

What I realized eventually is that even though they looked dead, they had actually gone to seed! 

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JUNE 3

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Things come and go. Flowers bloom and then they don’t. One day you have a lot of money in your bank account, another day you don’t. One day you are laughing with a friend, the next day they are gone. Life is made up of a bunch of temporary experiences - as I am sure you are well aware of. 

Although we may be aware of how temporary things are, we are more prone to prefer the positive temporary situations rather than the challenging ones - wanting the good to stay and the difficult to go. Our western culture celebrates and honors the season of blooming much more than the nessesary seasons of death. If the Ranunculus flowers never went to seed and died, they wouldn’t bloom the following year. The death season is vital to the blooming season.

Your suffering, your loss, your letting go season is vital to your blooming one. 

Its not only imperative that we acknowledge the temporary, we must embrace it - the death and the blooms. We must savor it, taste it, study it, document it, honor it. Its guaranteed to change, so what would it look like to embrace it while we have it? 

Step one to embracing it is to 

  1. Name the Season you/ your business/ your family is in. 

IN BLOOM 

Has your bud fully bloomed? Are you producing pollen? Are others able to take what you have and use it to propagate more? 

GONE TO SEED

Are you maybe in a cooler season, where you are watching the wind/ Spirit move? Are you feeling the emotions around death, loss, grief? 

      2. How could you more fully accept & support this reality today?

When something, someone, some idea is embraced in the present- its accepted, held, supported, covered, hugged, enclosed. 

Don't forget with death comes seeds and with blooms comes pollination. Both temporary but beautiful & necessary parts of the life cycle. 

 

Are the flowers left to die? The flowers die back and produce seed for re-planting for the next season. We feel that by allowing the plant to complete its lifecycle, it helps produce a more superior crop. - TheFlowerFields.com 

 

 

 

sarah shrevesComment